Boston Marathon Explosions April 15, 2013

Text of Obama’s remarks on Boston explosions

April 15, 2013

By The Associated Press

Text of President Barack Obama’s remarks following the explosions Monday at the Boston Marathon:

Good afternoon, everybody. Earlier today, I was briefed by my homeland security team on the events in Boston. We’re continuing to monitor and respond to the situation as it unfolds. And I’ve directed the full resources of the federal government to help state and local authorities protect our people, increase security around the United States as necessary, and investigate what happened. Read more… http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2013/04/15/news/obama-remarks-boston-explosions

Lawmakers suggest terrorism involved in Boston

April 15, 2013


By DAVID ESPO
AP Special Correspondent

WASHINGTON (AP) — With little official information to guide them, members of Congress said Monday there was scant or no doubt that the deadly Boston Marathon explosions were acts of terrorism and vowed to bring anyone responsible to justice.

“We just don’t know whether it’s foreign or domestic,” said Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security.

Read more… http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2013/04/15/news/lawmakers-suggest-terrorism-involved-in-boston

INFORMATION HOT LINES FOR FAMILIES OF THOSE WHO RAN BOSTON MARATHON

Boston Marathon Explosions

Boston Mayor’s Hotline for families of victims: 617-635-4500
Boston Police line for witnesses who may have information: 800-494-8477

Boston Marathon Athlete Tracker: This section of the marathon’s official website lets users track runners by name or bib number to find out if he or she finished the race and when.  Visit the website HERE

Google Person Finder’s Boston Marathon Page: Google’s Person Finder launched a page specifically for the Boston Marathon tragedy that lets users look up information to either find someone or offer information about someone. Visit the website HERE

RESOURCES FOR MARATHON VICTIMS:

Boston Marathon’s Official Facebook Page: Marathon officials have been regularly updating their Facebook page with the latest information, including where runners can pick up their running bags. Visit the Facebook page HERE

American Red Cross’s Safe and Well website: This allows people to register their status with the Red Cross so family members can search for them. Visit the website HERE

Strangers Offering Housing to Marathon Victims: Marathon participants or spectators who are stranded in the Boston area and need a place to stay can fill out THIS FORM to connect with people who are offering housing.

WHERE TO SUBMIT INFORMATION:

Boston Police Tip Line: Anyone with information about the incident at the Boston Marathon is encouraged to call the Boston Police Department’s tip line: 1-800-494-TIPS or call the department’s task force tip line at 617-223-6610 or email boston@ci.fbi.gov

 

OUR PRAYERS GO OUT TO THE FAMILIES AND FRIENDS OF THE BOSTON MARATHON
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Savior of Sorrows Carries Us Forever

Morning

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“My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?”
Psalm 22:1

We here behold the Saviour in the depth of his sorrows. No other place so well shows the griefs of Christ as Calvary, and no other moment at Calvary is so full of agony as that in which his cry rends the air–“My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” At this moment physical weakness was united with acute mental torture from the shame and ignominy through which he had to pass; and to make his grief culminate with emphasis, he suffered spiritual agony surpassing all expression, resulting from the departure of his Father’s presence. This was the black midnight of his horror; then it was that he descended the abyss of suffering. No man can enter into the full meaning of these words. Some of us think at times that we could cry, “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” There are seasons when the brightness of our Father’s smile is eclipsed by clouds and darkness; but let us remember that God never does really forsake us. It is only a seeming forsaking with us, but in Christ’s case it was a real forsaking. We grieve at a little withdrawal of our Father’s love; but the real turning away of God’s face from his Son, who shall calculate how deep the agony which it caused him?

In our case, our cry is often dictated by unbelief: in his case, it was the utterance of a dreadful fact, for God had really turned away from him for a season. O thou poor, distressed soul, who once lived in the sunshine of God’s face, but art now in darkness, remember that he has not really forsaken thee. God in the clouds is as much our God as when he shines forth in all the lustre of his grace; but since even the thought that he has forsaken us gives us agony, what must the woe of the Saviour have been when he exclaimed, “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?”

Evening

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“Lift them up forever.”

Psalm 28:9

God’s people need lifting up. They are very heavy by nature. They have no wings, or, if they have, they are like the dove of old which lay among the pots; and they need divine grace to make them mount on wings covered with silver, and with feathers of yellow gold. By nature sparks fly upward, but the sinful souls of men fall downward. O Lord, “lift them up forever!” David himself said, “Unto thee, O God, do I lift up my soul,” and he here feels the necessity that other men’s souls should be lifted up as well as his own. When you ask this blessing for yourself, forget not to seek it for others also. There are three ways in which God’s people require to be lifted up. They require to be elevated in character. Lift them up, O Lord; do not suffer thy people to be like the world’s people! The world lieth in the wicked one; lift them out of it! The world’s people are looking after silver and gold, seeking their own pleasures, and the gratification of their lusts; but, Lord, lift thy people up above all this; keep them from being “muck-rakers,” as John Bunyan calls the man who was always scraping after gold! Set thou their hearts upon their risen Lord and the heavenly heritage! Moreover, believers need to be prospered in conflict. In the battle, if they seem to fall, O Lord, be pleased to give them the victory. If the foot of the foe be upon their necks for a moment, help them to grasp the sword of the Spirit, and eventually to win the battle. Lord, lift up thy children’s spirits in the day of conflict; let them not sit in the dust, mourning forever. Suffer not the adversary to vex them sore, and make them fret; but if they have been, like Hannah, persecuted, let them sing of the mercy of a delivering God.

We may also ask our Lord to lift them up at the last! Lift them up by taking them home, lift their bodies from the tomb, and raise their souls to thine eternal kingdom in glory.

All rights belong to the collections of Charles Spurgeon(C)

 

Confession of Our Sins

The gift of salvation

Have you confessed your sins?

They took turns confessing their sins and worshipping the Lord their God. 

Nehemiah 9:3 NLT

The recognition of sin is the beginning of salvation. 

Martin Luther

Recognizing sin:

The year 1983 summoned forth two splendid examples of moral imperfection: Rep. Daniel Crane (R-Ill) and Rep. Gerry Studds (D-Mass). Both were censured by the House for sexual misconduct with 17-year-old pages.

The nation got a glimmer of their philosophical differences when Crane admitted tearfully that he “broke the laws of God and man.” He cast a vote for his own censure and faced the House as the Speaker announced the tally.

Studds, in contrast, defended the relationship with his page as “mutual and voluntary” and said the relationship didn’t warrant the “attention and action” of the House. Studds listened to the verdict from the Speaker with his back to the House.

Do they both deserve equal censure? Of course. But there’s one consolation for Crane. His philosophy (of an objective moral order promulgated by God in man’s nature) teaches that there is one thing worse than sin. That is denial of sin, which makes forgiveness impossible.

Thomas F. Roeser in the Chicago Sun-Times

The Bible wants nothing to do with moral relativism, and that is why some critics have singled out faithful Christians and Jews for particular scorn. These critics know that the objective moral standards defended by millions of faithful believers stand in the way of uprooting God from our nation. Just as the people of Nehemiah’s time confessed their sins and were restored, so we must ask the Lord to forgive us and heal our land.

Adapted from Men of Integrity Devotional Bible with devotions from the editors of Men of Integrity, a publication of Christianity Today International (Tyndale, 2002), entry for April 17.

 

Content is derived from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation and other publications of Tyndale Publishing House

ZIPPORAH WIFE OF MOSES

Zipporah

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The Woman Who Wrongly Opposed Her Husband

Scripture References—Exodus 2:21, 22;4:24, 25; 18:1-6

Name Meaning A Midian name, Zipporah means  little bird a sparrow.   Wilkinson observes that the feminine termination ah added to the common word Zippor, which is also the father of Balak, king of Moab   Such a name like â dove or â lamb would originally be a term of endearment, and thus the word passer ; sparrow is used by the Roman poets. Passer is also being found as a Roman family name. The root of this word is an Arabic verb, signifying to chirp.

Family Connection ”Zipporah was one of the seven daughters of Jethro who is also called Reuel and Raguel (Exodus 2:18; 4:24,25; 18:1-6; Numbers 10:29). It was to the home of this shepherd-priest in Midian that Moses came when at forty years of age he fled from Egypt, and meeting the seven girls drawing water Moses assisted them. Arriving home earlier than usual they told how the Egyptian had helped them. Brought up as a son of Pharaoh, Moses must have looked every inch a cultured Egyptian. Invited home, Moses was content to live with Jethro’s family, and married Zipporah, eldest of the seven daughters. Two sons were born of the union, Gershom and Eliezer. Some writers affirm, without adequate support, that the dark-skinned Ethiopian, the Cushite woman whom Miriam and Aaron were jealous over, is merely a description of Zipporah, and that therefore Moses was only married once. But the statement He had married an Ethiopian woman implies a recent occurrence, and that Zipporah, whom Moses had married 40 years previously, was dead. It is most unlikely that Miriam and Aaron would have waited all those years to murmur against Moses if Zipporah and the Ethiopian had been one and the same woman.

Zipporah, as a woman of Midian, did not share the spiritual values of her notable husband who found himself acting against the sacred tradition of Israel. This may be one reason why he named his second son Eliezer, meaning The Lord of my father was my help   To keep the peace, Moses compromised with his unbelieving wife and withheld circumcision, the sign of Go’s covenant, from Eliezer. The Lord intervened, and as a sign of divine displeasure, Moses is stricken with a mortal disease. Both Zipporah and Moses became conscience-stricken over the profanation of God’s covenant, and Zipporah yields. Moses is too prostrate to take a knife and circumcize the child, so his wife severed the boy’s foreskin and, throwing it down before Moses said, Surely a bloody husband art thou to me.

When Moses was restored to health relations in the home were not congenial, for he went on alone to Egypt, and Zipporah and the two sons went back to her home in Midian. Of this unhappy incident Alexander Whyte says, There are three most obscure and most mysterious verses in Moses’ history that mean, if they mean anything at all to us, just such an explosion of ill-temper as must have left its mark till death on the heart of Moses and Zipporah. The best of wives; his help meet given him of God; the most self-effacing of women; the wife who holds her husband in her heart as the wisest and best of men –;under sufficient trial and provocation and exasperation, even she will turn and will strike with just one word; just once in her whole married life time.

When Moses became the mighty leader and law-giver of Israel, there was the episode when Jethro, his father-in-law came out to the wilderness to see Moses and brought with him Zipporah and the two sons. The union was devoid of any restraint for Moses graciously received them and neither disowned nor ignored his wife and sons. But after this visit during which Jethro gave his over-burdened son-in-law some very practical advice, nothing more is said of Zipporah. She disappears without comment from the history of the Jewish people in which her husband figured so prominently.  Neither as the wife of her husband nor as the mother of her children did she leave behind her a legacy of spiritual riches€ How different it would have been if only she had fully shared her husband’s unusual meekness and godliness and, like him, left behind footprints in the sands of time!

Zipporah is far from being an inspiring character with which to end our alphabetical coverage of all the named women of the Bible. One could have wished for a nobler and more godly example of female biography as a fitting conclusion to this section of our study. Looking back over the large number of women whose names are recorded in Holy Writ we realize that taken together they represent all aspects of human nature good, bad and indifferent. For the majority, they lived their lives as they passed through this short scene of trial into eternity, leaving little trace behind them. But as we have seen, others, by their character and history, have left their names engraved in the impregnable Rock of Holy Scripture, with their records serving as either warning signals where they were conspicuous for evil, or as shining examples of high endeavor, where their lives were lived as unto Him who created both male and female for His glory.

 

Whatever was thus written in former days was written for our instruction, that by [our steadfast and patient] endurance and the encouragement [drawn] from the Scriptures we might hold fast and cherish hope (Romans 15:4Amplified Bible).