MANASSEH LEFT IDOLITRY

Manasseh

Then Manasseh knew that the Lord he was God. 

 2 Chronicles 33:13

Suggested Further Reading: Romans 1:18-25

It takes ten thousand times more faith to be an unbeliever than to be a believer in God’s revelation. One man comes to me and tells me I am credulous, because I believe in a great First Cause who created the heavens and the earth, and that God became man and died for sin. I tell him I may be, and no doubt am very credulous, as he conceives credulity, but I conceive that which I believe is in perfect consistency with my reason, and I therefore receive it. But, saith he, I am not credulous not at all.  Sir, I say, I should like to ask you one thing. You do not believe the world was created by God. No.  You must be amazingly credulous, then, I am sure. Do you think this Bible exists without being made? If you should say I am credulous, because I believe it had a printer and a binder, I should say that you were infinitely more credulous, if you assured me that it was made at all, and should you begin to tell me one of your theories about creation that atoms floated through space, and came to a certain shape, I should resign the palm of credulity to you. You believe, perhaps, moreover, that man came to be in this world through the improvement of certain creatures. I have read that you say that there were certain monads that afterwards they grew into fishes that these fishes wanted to fly, and then wings grew that by and by they wanted to crawl, and then legs came, and they became lizards, and by many steps they then became monkeys, and then the monkeys became men, and you believe yourself to be cousin ape to an orang-utan. Now, I may be very credulous, but really not so credulous as you are.

For meditation: If Manasseh, the greatest of idolaters (2 Chronicles 33:3), could be converted and worship the one true God, your most ardent evolutionist neighbours or colleagues can be converted and worship the God who created them!

Sermon no. 105 30 November (1856)

All rights belong to the collections of Charles Spurgeon(C)

 

Glory be to God, we know the end of the war!

Morning

Eph. 6:16 ...taking the shield of faith with which you will be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked one.

Eph. 6:16
…taking the shield of faith with which you will be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked one.

“And Amaziah said to the man of God, But what shall we do for the hundred talents which I have given to the army of Israel? And the man of God answered, The Lord is able to give thee much more than this.” 2 Chronicles 25:9

A very important question this seemed to be to the king of Judah, and possibly it is of even more weight with the tried and tempted O Christian. To lose money is at no times pleasant, and when principle involves it, the flesh is not always ready to make the sacrifice. “Why lose that which may be so usefully employed? May not the truth itself be bought too dear? What shall we do without it? Remember the children, and our small income!” All these things and a thousand more would tempt the Christian to put forth his hand to unrighteous gain, or stay himself from carrying out his conscientious convictions, when they involve serious loss. All men cannot view these matters in the light of faith; and even with the followers of Jesus, the doctrine of “we must live” has quite sufficient weight.

The Lord is able to give thee much more than this is a very satisfactory answer to the anxious question. Our Father holds the purse-strings, and what we lose for his sake he can repay a thousand-fold. It is ours to obey his will, and we may rest assured that he will provide for us. The Lord will be no man’s debtor at the last. Saints know that a grain of heart’s-ease is of more value than a ton of gold. He who wraps a threadbare coat about a good conscience has gained a spiritual wealth far more desirable than any he has lost. God’s smile and a dungeon are enough for a true heart; his frown and a palace would be hell to a gracious spirit. Let the worst come to the worst, let all the talents go, we have not lost our treasure, for that is above, where Christ sitteth at the right hand of God. Meanwhile, even now, the Lord maketh the meek to inherit the earth, and no good thing doth he withhold from them that walk uprightly.

Evening

“Michael and his angels fought against the dragon; and the dragon fought and his angels.”

Revelation 12:7

War always will rage between the two great sovereignties until one or other be crushed. Peace between good and evil is an impossibility; the very pretence of it would, in fact, be the triumph of the powers of darkness. Michael will always fight; his holy soul is vexed with sin, and will not endure it. Jesus will always be the dragon’s foe, and that not in a quiet sense, but actively, vigorously, with full determination to exterminate evil. All his servants, whether angels in heaven or messengers on earth, will and must fight; they are born to be warriors–at the cross they enter into covenant never to make truce with evil; they are a warlike company, firm in defence and fierce in attack. The duty of every soldier in the army of the Lord is daily, with all his heart, and soul, and strength, to fight against the dragon.

The dragon and his angels will not decline the affray; they are incessant in their onslaughts, sparing no weapon, fair or foul. We are foolish to expect to serve God without opposition: the more zealous we are, the more sure are we to be assailed by the myrmidons of hell. The church may become slothful, but not so her great antagonist; his restless spirit never suffers the war to pause; he hates the woman’s seed, and would fain devour the church if he could. The servants of Satan partake much of the old dragon’s energy, and are usually an active race. War rages all around, and to dream of peace is dangerous and futile.

Glory be to God, we know the end of the war. The great dragon shall be cast out and forever destroyed, while Jesus and they who are with him shall receive the crown. Let us sharpen our swords tonight, and pray the Holy Spirit to nerve our arms for the conflict. Never battle so important, never crown so glorious. Every man to his post, ye warriors of the cross, and may the Lord tread Satan under your feet shortly

 

All rights belong to the collectionsof Charles Spurgeon(C)

 

THE KING AND HIS CHARIOT

The royal rider in his glorious chariot

KING OF KINGS GLORY

Who is this that cometh out of the wilderness?   Song of Solomon 3:6

Suggested Further Reading: Acts 17:16-23

Who is this that cometh out of the wilderness?  The equipage excites the attention of the onlooker; his curiosity is raised, and he asks, Who is this? Now, in the first progress of the Christian church, in her very earliest days, there were persons who marvelled greatly: and though they put down the wonders of the day of Pentecost to drunkenness, yet they were all amazed, and were in doubt, saying one to another, What meaneth this?  In after years many a heathen philosopher said, What is this new power which is breaking the idols in pieces, changing old customs, making even thrones unsafe? What is this?  By and by, in the age of the Reformation, there were hooded monks, cardinals in their red hats, and bishops, and princes, and emperors, who all said, What is this? What strange doctrine has come to light?  In the times of the modern reformation, a century ago, when God was pleased to revive his church through the instrumentality of Whitefield and his brethren, there were many who said, What is this new enthusiasm, this Methodism? Whence came it, and what power is this which it wields? And, doubtless, whenever God shall be pleased to bring forth his church in power, and to make her mighty among the sons of men, the ignorance of men will be discovered breaking forth in wonder, for they will say, Who is this? Spiritual religion is as much a novelty now as in the day when Greek sages scoffed at it on Mars hill. The true church of God is a stranger and pilgrim still; an alien and a foreigner in every land; a speckled bird; a dove in the midst of ravens, a lily among thorns.

For meditation: The church will not arouse any worthwhile curiosity unless it is preaching the Lord Jesus Christ as he really is. Pray that Christ will be preached in truth (Philippians 1:18) in these days, and that men and women will be caused to ask, as when he was on earth, ‘Who is this?  (Matthew 21:10; Luke 5:21; 7:49; 9:9; 19:3).

Sermon no. 482 30 November (1862)

All rights belong to the collections of Charles Spurgeon(C)