THE KING BECAME HUMAN FOR OUR SAKES

No temptation is too great

1 Peter 5:8-9

1 Peter 5:8-9

 

Is it possible Jesus faced the same temptations you do?

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This High Priest of ours understands our weaknesses, for he faced all of the temptations we do, yet he did not sin. So let us come boldly to the throne of our gracious God. There we will receive his mercy, and we will find grace to help us when we need it.

Hebrews 4:15-16 NLT

But remember that the temptations that come into your life are no different from others experience. And God is faithful. He will keep the temptation from becoming so strong that you can’t stand up against it. When you are tempted, he will show you a way out so that you will not give in to it.

1 Corinthians 10:13 NLT

About this week’s promise

 

We experience temptation every day. Jesus himself was tempted in every way, yet his temptation did not lead to sin. It is not a sin to be tempted, but to prevent temptation from becoming sin, we must use all the resources God gives us to recognize, resist, and flee the situation. Since Jesus knows what it is like to be tempted, we can turn to him in all honesty when we’re having a battle with temptation. Have you talked with him lately about potential situations that would be difficult for you?

adapted from TouchPoint Bible with devotional commentary by Ron Beers and Gilbert Beers, Tyndale House Publishers (1996), p 1084

Digging Deeper

For more on this week’s promise, see Six Battles Every Man Must Win by Bill Perkins, Tyndale House Publishers (2003)
Bill Perkins offers hard-earned wisdom on how you can reset your sights and prevail in the challenges of life. With refreshing honesty, Bill chronicles his own struggles with disappointment, failure, and depression and tells how the little-known biblical story of David’s band of “mighty men” transformed his life.

Content is derived from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation and other publications of Tyndale Publishing House

GOD IS THE ONLY ONE IN CHARGE!

God is in charge of the world

Is Your Name

 

Is it not reassuring to know that God is King of kings?

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For the Lord is a great God, the great King above all gods.

Psalm 95:3 NLT

When the godly are in authority, the people rejoice. But when the wicked are in power, they groan. A just king gives stability to his nation…

Proverbs 29:2,4 NLT

Come, Thou Almighty King

Come, Thou Almighty King, Help us Thy name to sing, Help us to praise; Father! all-glorious, O’er all victorious, Come, and reign over us, Ancient of Days. Come, Thou Almighty King (v1), AUTHOR UNKNOWN

Presidents, kings, and other ruling officials should be honored and prayed for. So wrote the apostles Peter and Paul, who lived under the Roman emperors. But we must never forget that the King of kings and Lord of lords deserves our ultimate honor and complete allegiance.

This hymn appeared anonymously in George Whitfield’s Hymn Book, published in 1757. It is usually attributed to Charles Wesley, but was probably published anonymously for a good reason. Scholars think Wesley wrote this hymn as an imitation of the English national anthem, “God Save Our Gracious King.” The national anthem had just been written, and it had become popular throughout England. This hymn may have been Wesley’s way of keeping priorities straight.

Whether the author was trying to remind us that there is an almighty Kind greater than any earthly ruler, or whether he was simply writing it as a special hymn for Trinity Sunday, it is a grand and noble hymn praising our sovereign Lord.

Adapted from The One Year® Book of Hymns by Mark Norton and Robert Brown, Tyndale House Publishers (1995), entry for February 24

Content is derived from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation and other publications of Tyndale Publishing House

MOURNING OUR SINS

No temptation is too great

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Do you deeply mourn your sin, or choose cheap grace—and sin again?

Immediately the Holy Spirit compelled Jesus to go into the wilderness. He was there for forty days, being tempted by Satan. He was out among the wild animals, and angels took care of him.

Mark 1:12-13 NLT

Mourning our sins

 

Lord, who throughout these forty days For us didst fast and pray, Teach us with Thee to mourn our sins, And close by Thee to stay.
As Thou with Satan didst contend And didst the victory win, O give us strength in Thee to fight In Thee to conquer sin. Lenten Hymn (v1,2), CLAUDIA FRANCES HERNAMAN (1838-98)

We don’t know a lot about the forty days Jesus spent in the desert before His temptation. We know it was a time of fasting and probably of prayer. When the devil came to Him, the conquering words of Scripture were quick on Jesus’ tongue, so it may have been a time of meditation, a time of special communion with his Father.

This song draws the comparison between Jesus’ forty days in the desert and the forty days of Lent. Traditionally, the Lenten season is a time of fasting. People “give up” something for Lent. The idea is not to punish ourselves, but to put aside something that may distract us from our communion with God. It is a time for special devotion to God, a time when He may “abide with us” in a special way. Lent is a time to refocus on our relationship with Christ.

adapted from The One Year® Book of Hymns by Mark Norton and Robert Brown, Tyndale House Publishers (1995), entry for February 16


When you flee temptation, leave no forwarding address. AUTHOR UNKNOWN

GRACE OF THE CROSS

Morning

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“For as the sufferings of Christ abound in us, so our consolation also aboundeth by Christ.”

2 Corinthians 1:5

There is a blessed proportion. The Ruler of Providence bears a pair of scales–in this side he puts his people’s trials, and in that he puts their consolations. When the scale of trial is nearly empty, you will always find the scale of consolation in nearly the same condition; and when the scale of trials is full, you will find the scale of consolation just as heavy. When the black clouds gather most, the light is the more brightly revealed to us. When the night lowers and the tempest is coming on, the Heavenly Captain is always closest to his crew. It is a blessed thing, that when we are most cast down, then it is that we are most lifted up by the consolations of the Spirit. One reason is, because trials make more room for consolation. Great hearts can only be made by great troubles. The spade of trouble digs the reservoir of comfort deeper, and makes more room for consolation. God comes into our heart–he finds it full–he begins to break our comforts and to make it empty; then there is more room for grace. The humbler a man lies, the more comfort he will always have, because he will be more fitted to receive it. Another reason why we are often most happy in our troubles, is this–then we have the closest dealings with God. When the barn is full, man can live without God: when the purse is bursting with gold, we try to do without so much prayer. But once take our gourds away, and we want our God; once cleanse the idols out of the house, then we are compelled to honour Jehovah. “Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O Lord.” There is no cry so good as that which comes from the bottom of the mountains; no prayer half so hearty as that which comes up from the depths of the soul, through deep trials and afflictions. Hence they bring us to God, and we are happier; for nearness to God is happiness. Come, troubled believer, fret not over your heavy troubles, for they are the heralds of weighty mercies.

 

Evening

Psalm 139 Dove

“He shall give you another Comforter, that he may abide with you forever.”

John 14:16

 

The Great Father revealed himself to believers of old before the coming of his Son, and was known to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as the God Almighty. Then Jesus came, and the ever-blessed Son in his own proper person, was the delight of his people’s eyes. At the time of the Redeemer’s ascension, the Holy Spirit became the head of the present dispensation, and his power was gloriously manifested in and after Pentecost. He remains at this hour the present Immanuel–God with us, dwelling in and with his people, quickening, guiding, and ruling in their midst. Is his presence recognized as it ought to be? We cannot control his working; he is most sovereign in all his operations, but are we sufficiently anxious to obtain his help, or sufficiently watchful lest we provoke him to withdraw his aid? Without him we can do nothing, but by his almighty energy the most extraordinary results can be produced: everything depends upon his manifesting or concealing his power. Do we always look up to him both for our inner life and our outward service with the respectful dependence which is fitting? Do we not too often run before his call and act independently of his aid? Let us humble ourselves this evening for past neglects, and now entreat the heavenly dew to rest upon us, the sacred oil to anoint us, the celestial flame to burn within us. The Holy Ghost is no temporary gift, he abides with the saints. We have but to seek him aright, and he will be found of us. He is jealous, but he is pitiful; if he leaves in anger, he returns in mercy. Condescending and tender, he does not weary of us, but awaits to be gracious still.

Sin has been hammering my heart

Unto a hardness, void of love,

Let supplying grace to cross his art

Drop from above.

All rights belong to the collection of Charles Spurgeon(C)