The God of Peace

Psalm46-10[7]

The God of peace

“Now the God of peace be with you all. Amen.” Romans 15:33

Suggested Further Reading: Philippians 4:1-9

Let me briefly show you the appropriateness of this prayer. We indeed ought to have peace amongst ourselves. Joseph said to his brethren when they were going home to his father’s house, “See that ye fall not out by the way.” There was something extremely beautiful in that exhortation. You have all one father, you are of one family. Let men of two nations disagree; but you are of the seed of Israel; you are of one tribe and nation; your home is in one heaven. “See that ye fall not out by the way.” The way is rough; there are enemies to stop you. See that if you fall out when you get home, you do not fall out by the way. Keep together; stand by one another, defend each other’s character; manifest continual affection. The world hates you because you are not of the world. Oh! You must take care that you love one another. You are all going to the same house. You may disagree here, and not speak to one another, and be almost ashamed to sit at the same table, even at the sacrament; but you will all have to sit together in heaven. Therefore do not fall out by the way. Consider, again, the great mercies you have all shared together. You are all pardoned, you are all accepted, elected, justified, sanctified, and adopted. See that you fall not out when you have so many mercies. Joseph has filled your sacks, but if he has put some extra thing into Benjamin’s sack, do not quarrel with Benjamin about that, but rather rejoice because your sacks are full. You have all got enough, you are all secure, you have all been dismissed with a blessing.

For meditation: The God of love and peace will be seen to be present when his people live in peace with one another (2 Corinthians 13:11)

Sermon no. 49 3 November (Preached 4 November 1855)

All rights belong to the collections of Charles Spurgeon(C)

 

No respect to his greater Master

All-sufficiency magnified

THY WORD

I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me.   Philippians 4:13

 

Suggested Further Reading: Acts 22:6-16

Christians, beware lest that village in which you have found a quiet retreat from the cares of business, should rise up in judgment against you, to condemn you, because, having means and opportunity, you use the village for rest, but never seek to do any good in it. Take care, masters and mistresses, lest your servant’s souls be required of you at the last great day.  I worked for my master; they say, he paid me my wages, but had no respect to his greater Master, and never spoke to me, though he heard me swear, and saw me going on in my sins.  If I could I would thrust a thorn into the seat where you are now sitting, and make you spring up for a moment to the dignity of a thought of your responsibilities. Why, sirs, what has God made you for? What has he sent you here for? Did he make stars that should not shine, and suns that should give no light, and moons that should not cheer the darkness? Has he made rivers that shall not be filled with water, and mountains that shall not stay the clouds? Has he made even the forests which shall not give a habitation to the birds; or has he made the prairie which shall not feed the wild flocks? And has he made thee for nothing? Why, man, the nettle in the corner of the churchyard has its uses, and the spider on the wall serves her Maker; and you, a man in the image of God, a blood-bought man, a man who is in the path and track to heaven, a man regenerated, twice created, are you made for nothing at all but to buy and to sell, to eat and to drink, to wake and to sleep, to laugh and to weep, to live to yourself?

For meditation: The Christian—chosen to do (John 15:16), created to do (Ephesians 2:10), commanded to do (1 Corinthians 10:31), continue to do (Galatians 6:9,10). What?

Sermon no. 346 19 November (Preached 18 November 1860)

All rights belong to the collections of Charles Spurgeon(C)

 

Philippians 1:9-10 Live View Wailing Wall in Jerusalem

 

MAMA, THE KING IS COMING!

 

MAMA, THE KING IS COMING!

Philippians 1:9-10

And this I pray, that your love may abound yet more and more in
knowledge and in all judgment; That ye may approve things that are excellent;
that ye may be sincere and without offence till the day of Christ.

Live link to the Wailing Wallcn_image.size.western-wall-jerusalem-israel

http://jerusalemprayerteam.wbdev.com/Prayerwalls.aspx?PSID=41

 

 

GREAT BLESSING

Lord's Word Is A Sweet Fragrance

Lord’s Word Is A Sweet Fragrance

 

Overcoming discouragement brings great blessing

What, me worry?

“So I tell you, don’t worry about everyday life — whether you have enough food, drink, and clothes.

Matthew 6:25 NLT

Give your burdens to the Lord, and he will take care of you. He will not permit the godly to slip and fall.

Psalm 55:22 NLT

The mistrust of anxiety

 

Words of encouragement from the Master are always welcome. The stresses of life come upon us and a brother or sister in Christ reminds us that He is in control. He is sovereign, He knows when the sparrow falls, He numbers the hairs on our heads, He clothes the lilies of the field. He says not to worryabout our life, and we welcome the suggestion as an encouraging pat on the back.

But how often do we view this verse as a commandment from on high? It may not carry the force of “Thou shalt not,” and it may not have the emphasis of a “Go into all the world,” but it is written as an imperative nonetheless. “Do not,” Jesus says, and Paul echoes this injunction in Philippians: “Be anxious for nothing” (4:6). These are our liberating orders. We are told not to do something we hate doing anyway.

Dare we suggest by our worry that some catastrophe may slip by without His notice? No, “tragedies” befell Joseph, Moses, David, Jesus, Paul, and others, and God ordained them all for good. All of these surely could have worried, examining their circumstances while going through them. But looking back, we see God’s perfect plan unfolding. Therefore Jesus urges, even commands: Do not worry.

Anxiety does not empty tomorrow of its sorrows, but only empties today of its strength. 
CHARLES SPURGEON

Adapted from At His Feet by Chris Tiegreen, Tyndale House Publishers (2003), p 40.

 

Content is derived from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation and other publications of Tyndale Publishing House