Grieve the Spirit of God, and you will lose all power

Grieve not the Holy Spirit

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And grieve not the Holy Spirit of God, whereby ye are sealed unto the day of redemption.

Ephesians 4:30

Suggested Further Reading: Isaiah 63:7-19

Grieving the Holy Spirit produces a lamentable result. In the child of God it will not lead to his utter destruction, for no heir of heaven can perish; neither will the Holy Spirit be utterly taken away from him, for the Spirit of God is given to abide with us for ever. But the ill-effects are nevertheless most terrible. You will lose, my dear friends, all sense of the Holy Spirit’s presence: he will be as one hidden from you no beams of comfort, no words of peace, no thoughts of love there will be what Cowper calls, an aching void the world can never fill. Grieve the Holy Spirit, and you will lose all Christian joy; the light shall be taken from you, and you shall stumble in darkness; those very means of grace which once were such a delight, shall have no music in your ear. Your soul shall be no longer as a watered garden, but as a howling wilderness. Grieve the Spirit of God, and you will lose all power; if you pray, it will be a very weak prayer you will not prevail with God. When you read the Scriptures, you shall not be able to lift the latch and force your way into the inner mysteries of truth. When you go up to the house of God, there shall be none of that devout exhilaration, that running without weariness, that walking without fainting. You shall feel yourself like Samson when his hair was lost, weak, captive, and blinded. Let the Holy Spirit depart, and assurance is gone, doubts follow, questionings and suspicions are aroused. Grieve the Spirit of God, and usefulness will cease: the ministry shall yield no fruit; your Sunday School work shall be barren; your speaking to others and labouring for others shall be like sowing the wind.

For meditation:

If it is unprofitable for us to cause our church leaders to grieve, (Hebrews 13:17), how much worse it must be for us if we cause our God to grieve (Hebrews 3:7-18).

Sermon no. 738 3 March (1867)

All rights belong to the collections of Charles Spurgeon(C)

 

 

Go To God’s Throne In The Midst Of Tribulation-A Lesson From Job

Job 1:1–22

Imagine that your neighbor calls you at work, telling you the terrible news that your house and vehicles have been destroyed by fire, and while that person is still speaking, you learn that you’ve been fired from your job. While those words are still coming out of your employer’s mouth, your husband calls: your kids and all their families have been killed while they were vacationing together.

These are the unimaginable circumstances Job encountered. Devastating messages assaulted him again and again—each one coming while the messenger “was still speaking” (vs. 16–18). Who can even begin to comprehend his sheer horror at learning that all ten of his children were dead?

What did Job do? What was his initial response upon hearing of the loss of all he owned and of all he held dear? First, he grieved. He physically responded in the Eastern mode of grief by tearing his robe and shaving his head to display his deep sorrow. Yet no outward sign of grief could capture the inward torture Job felt.

Job’s next step demonstrates faithfulness toward God. He fell to the ground and worshiped. That’s right—he didn’t berate God or ask “Why me?” or “Why them?” Instead, he acknowledged that everything comes from God, and he praised the name of the Lord. Try envisioning that scene. It will take your breath away. Picture this man, deep in the throes of grief, praising God. In light of the horrific blows dealt to him, how did he do that?

Only one answer suffices: Job knew God—really knew him with an uncommon intimacy. His close communion with God had taught him that God was the only one who could give him any kind of real comfort. Job’s knowledge yielded a deep trust in an infallible Lord—a trust that enabled Job’s heart to keep beating even in the face of overwhelming heartbreak. It enabled him to respond to horrible pain with worship and praise.

Yes, times of seeking for answers and grappling for understanding followed that day of destruction, but Job’s initial response reflected a heart that knew and trusted God. What an amazing and beautiful image!

Reflection

  1. How have you responded to bad news in the past? With praise? Anger? Despair? Confusion?
  2. Job knew God well enough to turn to him in grief. How deep does your knowledge of God go? How close is your heart attuned to his?
  3. How might going through tough times or experiencing pain and grief help someone know God?

Job 1:20–21
Then he fell to the ground in worship and said: “Naked I came from my mother’s womb, and naked I will depart. The LORD gave and the LORD has taken away; may the name of the LORD be praised.”

Related Readings

Deuteronomy 32:36–39; Psalms 42:1–11; 86:1–17

Note:  I always try to give credit to original author/photographers in my usage for lessons, educational purposes, etc…this lesson came to me in an email.  Unfortunately, there is no author attached to it.  I do not take any credit; it is a wonderful lesson in the Lord’s Word.

Torah inside of the former Glockengasse Synago...

Torah inside of the former Glockengasse Synagogue in Cologne (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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