The Tree That Keeps On Giving!

The Shameful Tree

Then Jesus shouted, “Father, I entrust my spirit into your hands!” And with those words he breathed his last.

Luke 23:46 NLT

Behold the Savior of mankind nailed to the shameful tree! How vast the love that Him inclined to bleed and die for thee!

‘Tis done! the precious ransom’s paid! “Receive my soul!” He cries; see where He bows His sacred head! He bows His head and dies!

Behold the Savior of Mankind
Samuel Wesley (1662-1735)

Saved from the fire

On February 9, 1709, a fire ripped through a rectory in the village of Epworth, England. The Wesley family lost nearly everything. Miraculously, their six-year-old boy named John (who would later found the Methodist church) was saved from the fire, as was a piece of paper bearing this hymn, written by the rector, Samuel Wesley.

Samuel Wesley, father of John and Charles (and seventeen other children), was scholarly and stern. His major academic project was a study of the book of Job. And he faced a great deal of suffering himself. Nine of his children died at birth or in infancy. He was frequently in debt (even spending three months in debtors’ prison). Of course, there was also that devastating fire.

This hymn, however, shows us a slightly different side of Samuel Wesley. The theme of suffering is strong, but there’s an attitude of love, of devotion. Apparently he taught his famous sons more than just discipline, but also a deep appreciation for what Christ accomplished through His suffering.

Our Holy Week readings are adapted from The One Year® Book of Hymns by Mark Norton and Robert Brown, Tyndale House Publishers (1995). Today’s is taken from the entry for March 22.

For more reflection on Holy week, see The Passion, Tyndale’s companion book to Mel Gibson’s powerful movie about the last twelve hours of Jesus’ life.

Content is derived from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation and other publications of Tyndale Publishing House

YESHUA

YESHUA

Morning

“Though he were a Son, yet learned he obedience by the things which he suffered.”
Hebrews 5:8

We are told that the Captain of our salvation was made perfect through suffering, therefore we who are sinful, and who are far from being perfect, must not wonder if we are called to pass through suffering too. Shall the head be crowned with thorns, and shall the other members of the body be rocked upon the dainty lap of ease? Must Christ pass through seas of his own blood to win the crown, and are we to walk to heaven dryshod in silver slippers? No, our Master’s experience teaches us that suffering is necessary, and the true-born child of God must not, would not, escape it if he might. But there is one very comforting thought in the fact of Christ’s “being made perfect through suffering”–it is, that he can have complete sympathy with us. “He is not an high priest that cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities.” In this sympathy of Christ we find a sustaining power. One of the early martyrs said, “I can bear it all, for Jesus suffered, and he suffers in me now; he sympathizes with me, and this makes me strong.” Believer, lay hold of this thought in all times of agony. Let the thought of Jesus strengthen you as you follow in his steps. Find a sweet support in his sympathy; and remember that, to suffer is an honourable thing–to suffer for Christ is glory. The apostles rejoiced that they were counted worthy to do this. Just so far as the Lord shall give us grace to suffer for Christ, to suffer with Christ, just so far does he honour us. The jewels of a Christian are his afflictions. The regalia of the kings whom God hath anointed are their troubles, their sorrows, and their griefs. Let us not, therefore, shun being honoured. Let us not turn aside from being exalted. Griefs exalt us, and troubles lift us up. “If we suffer, we shall also reign with him.”

Evening

“I called him, but he gave me no answer.”
Song of Solomon 5:6

Prayer sometimes tarrieth, like a petitioner at the gate, until the King cometh forth to fill her bosom with the blessings which she seeketh. The Lord, when he hath given great faith, has been known to try it by long delayings. He has suffered his servants’ voices to echo in their ears as from a brazen sky. They have knocked at the golden gate, but it has remained immovable, as though it were rusted upon its hinges. Like Jeremiah, they have cried, “Thou hast covered thyself with a cloud, that our prayer should not pass through.” Thus have true saints continued long in patient waiting without reply, not because their prayers were not vehement, nor because they were unaccepted, but because it so pleased him who is a Sovereign, and who gives according to his own pleasure. If it pleases him to bid our patience exercise itself, shall he not do as he wills with his own! Beggars must not be choosers either as to time, place, or form. But we must be careful not to take delays in prayer for denials: God’s long-dated bills will be punctually honoured; we must not suffer Satan to shake our confidence in the God of truth by pointing to our unanswered prayers. Unanswered petitions are not unheard. God keeps a file for our prayers–they are not blown away by the wind, they are treasured in the King’s archives. This is a registry in the court of heaven wherein every prayer is recorded. Tried believer, thy Lord hath a tear-bottle in which the costly drops of sacred grief are put away, and a book in which thy holy groanings are numbered. By and by, thy suit shall prevail. Canst thou not be content to wait a little? Will not thy Lord’s time be better than thy time? By and by he will comfortably appear, to thy soul’s joy, and make thee put away the sackcloth and ashes of long waiting, and put on the scarlet and fine linen of full fruition.

All rights belong to the collection of Charles Spurgeon(C)

Prayer:

Father God, thank you for your Son, Jesus Christ1  Thank you, Jesus for loving to the point of death on a tree! Holy Spirit thank you being our life line of Truth to Father God and our Mediator, Jesus our Savior!  We praise your Holy Name that is above All names.  Our souls cry to the heavens, Maranatha!  Come Lord Jesus quickly.  Keep your loving hand of protection upon Israel and her children.  Turn our nation, “America” back to you Father.  You have shown me in the spirit what is coming-grant me your strength, Father God, to stand til the end!!!  Allow me your grace and mercy to love others as your Son loves us.  Protect my family, friends, brothers and sisters in the Body of Christ(here on the internet) and abroad.  I am here, Lord, use me.  Praise be to the Lord and for His grace and mercy to His children for His love, daily bread, physical health, finances, jobs and homes.  Allow us to serve you mightily and stand strong in your strength and not of ourselves. Amen

Fighting Temptation

Christ is our Redeemer

Go to Dark Gethsemane

Then Jesus brought them into an olive grove called Gethsemane, and he said, “Sit here while I go on ahead to pray.”…He went on a little farther and fell face down on the ground, praying, “My Father! If it is possible, let this cup of suffering be taken away from me. Yet I want your will, not mine.”

Matthew 26:36-39 NLT

Go to dark Gethsemane, ye that feel the tempter’s power; your Redeemer’s conflict see; watch Him one bitter hour; turn not from His grief away; learn of Jesus Christ to pray.

See Him at the judgment hall, beaten, bound, reviled, arraigned; see Him meekly bearing all! Love to man His soul sustained. Shun not suffering, shame or loss; learn of Christ to bear the cross.

Go to Dark Gethsemane
James Montgomery (1771-1854)

Learning from Christ’s passion

Step by step James Montgomery takes us through Christ’s passion. We go with our Lord to the Garden of Gethsemane, where those troublesome thoughts of death assailed Him. While His trusted friends drifted off to sleep, Jesus fought off the temptation to avoid the Cross. It was a difficult time, and in Montgomery’s simple text we feel the drops of sweat.

At Jesus’ trial — a shabby excuse for justice if ever there was one — He bore the beating and badgering without speaking a word. He was carrying our sins with Him to the Cross. At the Cross we can only fall at His feet to worship.

At each point of this journey we have much to learn from our Savior. We can learn to pray when tempted and to endure suffering with patience. And Christ teaches us to rise in newness of life, to live in a way that honors Him, and ultimately to join Him in glory.

Our Holy Week readings are adapted from The One Year® Book of Hymns by Mark Norton and Robert Brown, Tyndale House Publishers (1995). Today’s is taken from the entry for April 1.

Content is derived from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation and other publications of Tyndale Publishing House

 

PALM SUNDAY

Hosanna, Loud Hosanna

The next day, the news that Jesus was on the way to Jerusalem swept through the city. A huge crowd of Passover visitors took palm branches and went down the road to meet him.

John 12:12 NLT

From Olivet they followed mid an exultant crowd the victor palm branch waving, and chanting clear and loud; the Lord of men and angels rode on in lowly state, nor scorned that little children should on His bidding wait.

Hosanna, Loud Hosanna by Jeannette Threlfall (1821-1880)

Praising her victorious Savior

Today is Palm Sunday. The triumphal entry into Jerusalem was the scene of a curious exchange between Jesus and the religious leaders of the day. A crowd was following Jesus, waving palms and singing, “Hosanna!” This term, literally meaning, “Lord, save us!” was also a cry of praise.

This crowd included a number of children, no doubt caught up in the excitement of the day. The leaders asked Jesus to tell the children to stop such singing. Certainly Jesus wouldn’t want innocent kids to be guilty of blasphemy. “Do you hear what these children are saying?” they asked Jesus.

Yes, Jesus said, quoting Psalm 8:2, “From the lips of children and infants you have ordained praise.” (Matthew 21:16)

You might think that Jeannette Threlfall had many reasons not to praise God. Orphaned young, shuttled among relatives, she was injured in an accident and became an invalid. Yet she remained cheery and faithful, penning many Christian poems and hymns. Her life was a cry of hosanna! to her victorious Savior.

Our Holy Week readings are adapted from The One Year® Book of Hymns by Mark Norton and Robert Brown, Tyndale House Publishers (1995). Today’s is taken from the entry for March 31.

For more reflection on Holy week, see The Passion, Tyndale’s companion book to Mel Gibson’s powerful movie about the last twelve hours of Jesus’ life.

Content is derived from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation and other publications of Tyndale Publishing House