Let the Christian parent explain to the child what prayer is!

The child Samuel’s prayer

“And you hath he quickened, who were dead in trespasses and sins.” Ephesians 2:1

“And you hath he quickened, who were dead in trespasses and sins.” Ephesians 2:1

‘Speak, Lord; for thy servant heareth.’ 1 Samuel 3:9

Suggested Further Reading: Matthew 21:6–16

Children who are taught a form of prayer may perhaps by divine grace be enabled to use the form in all sincerity of heart: I hope they may; but I think they are more likely to understand the things of God, if instead of teaching them the form, you explain to them the meaning and the value of prayer. I take this to be the best plan. Let the Christian parent explain to the child what prayer is; tell him that God answers prayer; direct him to the Saviour, and then urge him to express his desires in his own language, both when he rises, and when he goes to rest. Gather the little ones around your knee and listen to their words, suggesting to them their needs, and reminding them of God’s gracious promise. You will be amazed and, I may add, somewhat amused too; but you will be frequently surprised at the expressions they will use, the confessions they will make, the desires they will utter; and I am certain that any Christian person standing within earshot, and listening to the simple prayer of a little child earnestly asking God for what it thinks it wants, would never afterwards wish to teach a child a form, but would say, that as a matter of education to the heart, the extemporaneous utterance was infinitely superior to the best form, and that the form should be given up for ever. However, do not let me speak too sweepingly. If you must teach your child to say a form of prayer, at least take care that you do not teach him to say anything which is not true. If you teach your children a catechism, mind that it is thoroughly scriptural, or you may train them up to tell falsehoods.

For meditation: When secondhand man-made devotions begin in the mouth rather than in the heart, they are not acceptable to God (Isaiah 29:13). The Lord Jesus Christ loved children to come to him as children (Mark 10:13–16); God can teach them heartfelt praise (Matthew 21:15–16).

Sermon no. 586   8 June (Undated Sermon)

All rights belong to the collections of Charles Spurgeon(C)

 

PRAYER

Blessings come from obeying God

JOHN 3:16 GOD'S PRECIOUS GIFT TO ALL!

When and how do you pray?

Psalm 92[a] KJV

A psalm. A song. For the Sabbath day.

It is good to praise the Lord
    and make music to your name, O Most High,
proclaiming your love in the morning
    and your faithfulness at night,
to the music of the ten-stringed lyre
    and the melody of the harp.

For you make me glad by your deeds, Lord;
    I sing for joy at what your hands have done.

 

Footnotes:

  1. Psalm 92:1 In Hebrew texts 92:1-15 is numbered 92:2-16.

Giving thanks morning and night

What a way to start the day! The verses in Psalm 92 represent one of the first prayers on the priests’ lips on the Sabbath day: “You thrill me, Lord, with all you have done for me!”

What if before you read your morning paper, before you head out the door, before you start the countless tasks you have to do for each day, you determine that you’re going to start your day with praise for how God has “thrilled” you? Right now, you have the chance to start afresh. A new day is before you. Why not start things off right with a regimen of praise instead of the old routine? In prayer today, proclaim his unfailing love, and tonight, before going to bed, praise him again for his faithfulness.

Adapted from The One Year Book of Bible Prayers (Tyndale House) entry for May 15

 

Content is derived from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation and other publications of Tyndale Publishing House