JUDGMENT IN THE HOUSE OF GOD

JUDGMENT IN THE HOUSE OF GOD

AUTHOR’S NOTE:  HAVE YOU THOUGHT ABOUT THE SPIRITUAL CONDITION AMERICA IS IN AND WHY IT IS IN SUCH A CONDITION?  MY SPIRIT DOES GRIEVE FOR OUR NATION AND LIKE MANY WALL WATCHERS WE HAVE PUT OUT ” WARNINGS ” OVER THE YEARS.  YET, THE CHURCH OF GOD HAS STILL REMAINED IN HER SLUMBER.  WARNINGS AND SALVATION BLOG  DECEPTION IN THE PULPIT  HIS PRECIOUS NAME IS EVERYWHERE   CHURCH IN CRITICAL CONDITION  THESE ARE BUT A FEW OF WHAT I HAVE BEEN LED TO SHARE TRYING TO GET THE CHURCH TO LISTEN AND WAKE UP!!  WATCH THE VIDEO I HAVE BEEN DIRECTED OF THE LORD TO PRODUCE BOTH FOR CHURCH AND AMERICA!  IF YOU CARE YOU WILL “TAKE THE TIME” TO LISTEN AND SHARE THIS MESSAGE!

4TH JULY 2014 “IN YOUR FACE AMERICA” NWO

Kadosh Adonai (Hebrew) Elisheva Shomron (w/ lyrics)

AUTHOR’S NOTE CONTINUED:  ON JULY 5, 2015 THE LORD DEALT WITH MY HEART AGAIN ON THE CONDITION OF AMERICA AND I WAS GIVEN SCRIPTURE TO SHARE WITH “THE HOUSE OF GOD ON JUDGMENT!”

Luke Chapter 23   CRYING AND LAMENTATIONS

MESSAGE GIVEN TO ME WAS “JUDGMENT IN THE HOUSE OF GOD” JUST AS IT WAS IN THE HOUSE OF ISRAEL.

SPECIFIC VERSES LUKE 23:27-32  HIGHLIGHTED WORDS ARE RHEMA WORD GIVEN TO ME!

27 And there followed him a great company of people, and of women, which also bewailed and lamented him.

28 But Jesus turning unto them said, Daughters of Jerusalem, weep not for me, but weep for yourselves, and for your children.

29 For, behold, the days are coming, in the which they shall say, Blessed are the barren, and the wombs that never bare, and the paps which never gave suck.

30 Then shall they begin to say to the mountains, Fall on us; and to the hills, Cover us.

31 For if they do these things in a green tree, what shall be done in the dry? (EZK. 20:47 GREEN AND DRY TREE ; 21:3-4 DRAWN SWORD FROM SHEATH-RIGHTEOUS AND WICKED)

CONTEXT OF LUKE 23:27-31 CLEARLY IS THE JUDGMENT COMING UPON ISRAEL; JUDGMENT ELSEWHERE IN LUKE IS REFERRED TO AS FIRE.

Luke 3:9 And even now the ax is laid to the root of the trees. Therefore every tree which does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire.”

Luke 3:17 His winnowing fan is in His hand, and He will thoroughly clean out His threshing floor, and gather the wheat into His barn; but the chaff He will burn with unquenchable fire.”

Luke 12:49 “I came to send fire on the earth, and how I wish it were already kindled!

Luke 17:29 but on the day that Lot went out of Sodom it rained fire and brimstone from heaven and destroyed them all.

EZEKIEL 20:47 CONSIDER WHAT CHARLES SPURGEON SAID 

Charles Spurgeon said, “Decayed churches can most certainly be revived by the preaching of the Word, accompanied by the coming of the heavenly breath from the four winds.” [from The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit, vol. 10, page 426; quoted in Warren Wiersbe’s commentary on Ezekiel, page 197]

EZEKIEL 21:3-4    CONSIDER CHARLES SPURGEON AGAIN……BELOW IN SERMON NO.165

And say to the land of Israel, Thus saith the Lord; Behold, I am against thee, and will draw forth my sword out of his sheath, and will cut off from thee the righteous and the wicked.

Seeing then that I will cut off from thee the righteous and the wicked, therefore shall my sword go forth out of his sheath against all flesh from the south to the north:

CHARLES SPURGEON  A Sermon  (No. 165)

Delivered on Sabbath Morning, November 29, 1857, by the REV. C. H. Spurgeon at the Music Hall, Royal Surrey Gardens.

SNIPPET:  READ MORE (EMPHASIS MINE)

The text is a solemn one—”He heard the sound of the trumpet, and took not warning: his blood shall be upon him.” The first head is this—the warning was all that could be desired—“he heard the sound of the trumpet.” Secondly, the excuses for not attending to the startling warning are all of them both frivolous and wicked: and therefore, in the third place, the consequences of inattention must be terrible, because man’s blood must then be on his own head.

PSALM 91:1 He that dwelleth in the secret place of the most High shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty.

PSALM 91:1
He that dwelleth in the secret place of the most High shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty.

SO IT SHALL BE IN THE HOUSE OF CHRIST (MY HEART IS SO HEAVY!)

1 PETER 4:17 GIVEN TO ME “WARNING” JUDGMENT “MUST” BEGIN IN THE HOUSE OF GOD!!!

17 For the time is come that judgment must begin at the house of God: and if it first begin at us, what shall the end be of them that obey not the gospel of God?  MORE VERSES ON JUDGMENT

JAMES 12:6  King James Bible
For whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth, and scourgeth every son whom he receiveth.

Lamentations 3:39
Why should the living complain when punished for their sins?

Revelation 3:19
Those whom I love I rebuke and discipline. So be earnest and repent.

"Behold, the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom." Matthew 27:51

“Behold, the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom.”
Matthew 27:51

AGAIN!  IMPORTANT STUDY ON EZEKIEL 34

1 PETER 1:19 But with the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot:

1 PETER 1:19 But with the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot:

FEED MY FLOCK

1 PETER 5 2

2 Feed the flock of God which is among you, taking the oversight thereof,

AUTHOR’S NOTE CONTINUED:  THE HOUSE OF GOD IS AS A VALLEY OF DRY BONES!  THE SHEEP ARE SCATTERED TO THE FOUR WINDS LONGING FOR THE SPIRIT OF TRUTH!  THE ASSIGNMENTS GIVEN TO APPOINTED MEN OF GOD HAVE ABANDONED THEIR POST, “THE PULPIT!”  THEY HAVE GONE THE WAYWARD SIDE AND CHASE FANCIFUL DREAMS OF PROSPERITY AND FEEL GOOD GOSPEL.   HOW MANY GENERATIONS HAVE WE LOST BECAUSE THE POSTS OF PREACHERS AND DISCIPLES HAVE GONE TO SLEEP OR ALL TOGETHER HAVE JUST GIVEN UP TO FIGHT THE GOOD FIGHT?

PETER EXHORTS THE ELDERS OF THE CHURCH TO FEED THE FLOCK THAT ARE AMONG YOU AND TAKING OVERSIGHT THERE OF, WILLINGLY AND A READY MIND.  ELDERS OF THE CHURCH ARE TO BE EXAMPLES TO THE FLOCK.  IT BREAKS MY HEART TO WITTINESS THE AUDACITY AND CONTEMPT AND DOWN RIGHT BLASPHEMY IN SOME CASES OF THE ASSIGNED SHEPHERDS OF CHURCHES.  1 PETER 5 COVERS THESE URGENT WORDS FOR SAID ELDERS/SHEPHERDS OF THE CHURCH AND CHARLES SPURGEON COVERED A MULTITUDE ON THE SUBJECT.

CONSIDER CHARLES SPURGEON SERMON NO. 428 ON “NATURE OF SIN”

….nature of sin. This will be clear if you think for a moment that anything which is a transgression of God’s command is sin, and if there were no other command; the one in our Text being broken would involve us in iniquity. But it is a precept earnestly repeated by our Savior many times, it is one which the Apostles have reiterated again and again, and one which cannot be neglected without involving transgression. Besides, the very essence of anxious care is the imagining that we are wiser than God, and the thrusting of ourselves into His place, to do for Him that which we dream He either cannot or will not do! We attempt to think of that which we fancy He will forget; or we labor to take upon ourselves that burden which He either is not able or willing to carry for us. Now, this impertinence, this presumption, what if I say, this audacity, has in it the very nature of sin, to attempt to know better than God, to snatch from His hands the helm by which He guides affairs, to attempt to correct His charts, to re-map His Providence! This, indeed, is such impertinence, that as the guardian Scripture pushes back the intruder; it demands of him, “Are you also one of the King’s Counsel? What are you doing here? He took no counsel with you when He made the heavens and the earth, and balanced the clouds, and stretched out the skies like a tent to dwell in, how dare you come here and offer advice to Perfect Wisdom, and aid to Omnipotent Strength?” There is in anxious care the very nature of sin!

1 PETER 5:1-11 (ALSO: EZEKIEL 34:4)

1 The elders which are among you I exhort, who am also an elder, and a witness of the sufferings of Christ, and also a partaker of the glory that shall be revealed:

2 Feed the flock of God which is among you, taking the oversight thereof, not by constraint, but willingly; not for filthy lucre, but of a ready mind;

3 Neither as being lords over God’s heritage, but being ensamples to the flock.

4 And when the chief Shepherd shall appear, ye shall receive a crown of glory that fadeth not away.

5 Likewise, ye younger, submit yourselves unto the elder. Yea, all of you be subject one to another, and be clothed with humility: for God resisteth the proud, and giveth grace to the humble.

6 Humble yourselves therefore under the mighty hand of God, that he may exalt you in due time:

7 Casting all your care upon him; for he careth for you.

8 Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:

9 Whom resist stedfast in the faith, knowing that the same afflictions are accomplished in your brethren that are in the world.

10 But the God of all grace, who hath called us unto his eternal glory by Christ Jesus, after that ye have suffered a while, make you perfect, stablish, strengthen, settle you.

11 To him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen.

Wherefore he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them. Hebrews 7:25 AKJV

Wherefore he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them. Hebrews 7:25 AKJV

EZEKIEL 34 THE LORD GIVES WARNING TO THE LEADERS OF ISRAEL AND TO TODAY’S CHURCH LEADERS/A MESSAGE OF HOPE FOR THE FLOCK

STUDY ON EZEKIEL 34 VERSE BY VERSE

CROSS REFERENCES EZEKIEL 34

(WARNINGS TO LEADERS/PROMISES TO FLOCKS OF GOD)

CONSIDER CHARLES SPURGEON SERMON NO. 28 EZEKIEL 34

222

EZEKIEL 34:7

7 Therefore, ye shepherds, hear the word of the LORD;

Revelation 3:20(KJV) 20 Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me.

Revelation 3:20(KJV)
20 Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me.

 EZEKIEL 34:11

11 For thus saith the Lord GOD; Behold, I, even I, will both search my sheep, and seek them out

AUTHOR’S ENDING NOTE:

SIN AND REPENTANCE 

CONFESSION OF SIN

SHALL I TOLERATE …

LITTLE FOXES SPOIL THE VINE

ARE YOU COVERED

SALVATION IN CHRIST JESUS

WEDDING INVITATION

We like sheep have gone astray

The Sheep Before the Shearers

Vine Bk of Life

“As a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so he openeth not his mouth.”—Isaiah 53:7.

UR LORD Jesus so took our place that we are in this chapter compared to sheep: “all we like sheep have gone astray,” and he is compared to a sheep also,—”As a sheep before her shearers is dumb.” It is wonderful how complete was the interchange of positions between Christ and his people, so that he became what they were in order that they might become what he is. We can well understand how we should be the sheep and he the shepherd; but to liken the Son of the Highest to a sheep would have been unpardonable presumption had not his own Spirit employed the condescending figure.     Though the emblem is very gracious, its use in this place is by no means singular, for our Lord, had been long before Isaiah’s day typified by the lamb of the Passover. Since then he has been proclaimed as “the Lamb of God which taketh away the sin of the world;” and indeed even in his glory he is the Lamb in the midst of the throne.     I. In opening up this divine emblem I would invite you to consider, first, OUR SAVIOUR’S PATIENCE, set forth under the figure of a sheep dumb before her shearers.     Our Lord was brought to the shearers that he might be shorn of his comfort, and of his honour, shorn even of his good name, and shorn at last of life itself; but when under the shearers he was as silent as a sheep. How patient he was before Pilate, and Herod, and Caiaphas, and on the cross. You have no record of his uttering any exclamation of impatience at the pain and shame which he received at the hands of these wicked men. You hear not one bitter word. Pilate cries, “Answerest thou nothing? Behold how many things they witness against thee”; and Herod is wofully disappointed, for he expected to see some miracle wrought by him. All that our Lord does say is in submissive tones, like the bleating of a sheep, though infinitely more full of meaning. He utters sentences like these,—”For this purpose was I born, and came into the world, that I might bear witness to the truth,” and, “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.” Otherwise he is all patience and silence.     Remember, first, that our Lord was dumb and opened not his mouth against his adversaries, and did not accuse one of them of cruelty or injustice. They slandered him, but he replied not; false witnesses arose, but he answered them not. One would have thought he must have spoken when they spat in his face. Might he not have said, “Friend, why doest thou this? For which of all my works dost thou insult me?” But the time for such expostulations was over. When they smote him on the face with the palms of their hands, it would not have been wonderful if he had said, “Wherefore do you smite me so?” But no; he is as though he heard not their revilings. He brings no accusation to his Father. He needed only to have lifted his eye to heaven and legions of angels would have chased away the ribald soldiery; one flash of a seraph’s wing and Herod had been eaten by worms, and Pilate had died the death he well deserved as an unjust judge. The hill of the cross might have become a volcano’s mouth to swallow up the whole multitude who stood there jesting and jeering at him: but no, there was no display of power, or rather there was so great a display of power over himself that he restrained Omnipotence itself with a strength which never can be measured.     Again, as he did not utter a word against his adversaries, so he did not say a word against any one of us. You remember how Zipporah said to Moses, “Surely a bloody husband art thou to me,” as she saw her child bleeding; and surely Jesus might have said to his church, “Thou art a costly spouse to me, to bring me all this shame and bloodshedding.” But he giveth liberally, he openeth the very fountain of his heart, and he upbraideth not. He had reckoned on the uttermost expenditure, and therefore he endured the cross, despising the shame.

“This was compassion like a God, That when the Saviour knew, The price of pardon was his blood, His pity ne’er withdrew.”    No doubt he looked across the ages; for that eye of his was not dim, even when bloodshot on the tree: he must have foreseen your indifference and mine, our coldness of heart, and base unfaithfulness, and he might have left on record some such words as these: “I am suffering for those who are utterly unworthy of my regard; their love will be a miserable return for mine. Though I give my whole heart for them, how lukewarm is their love to me! I am sick of them, I am weary of them, and it is woe to me that I should be laying down my heart’s blood for such a worthless race as these my people are.” But there is not a hint of such a feeling. No. “Having loved his own which were in the world, he loved them unto the end,” and he did not utter a syllable that looked like murmuring at his suffering on their behalf, or regretting that he had commenced the work.     And again, as there was not a word against his adversaries, nor a word against you nor me, so there was not a word against his Father, nor a syllable of repining at the severity of the chastisement laid upon him for our sakes. You and I have murmured when under a comparatively light grief, thinking ourselves hardly done by. We have dared to cry out against God, “My face is foul with weeping, and on my eyelids is the shadow of death; not for any injustice in mine hands: also my prayer is pure.” But not so the Saviour; in his mouth were no complaints. It is quite impossible for us to conceive how the Father pressed and bruised him, yet was there no repining. “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” is an exclamation of astonished grief, but it is not the voice of complaint. It shows manhood in weakness, but not manhood in revolt. Many are the Lamentations of Jeremiah, but few are the lamentations of Jesus. Jesus wept, and Jesus sweat great drops of blood, but he never murmured nor felt rebellion in his heart.     Behold your Lord and Saviour lying in passive resignation beneath the shearers, as they take away everything that is dear to him, and yet he openeth not his mouth. I see in this our Lord’s complete submission. He gives himself up; there is no reserve about it. The sacrifice did not need binding with cords to the horns of the altar. How different from your case and mine! He stood there willing to suffer, to be spit upon, to be shamefully entreated, and to die, for in him there was a complete surrender. He was wholly given to do the Father’s will, and to work out our redemption. There was complete self-conquest too. In him no faculty arose to plead for liberty, and ask to be exempted from the general strain; no limb of the body, no portion of the mind, no faculty of the spirit started, but all submitted to the divine will: the whole Christ gave up his whole being unto God, that he might perfectly offer himself without spot for our redemption.     There was not only self-conquest, but complete absorption in his work. The sheep, lying there, thinks no more of the pastures, it yields itself up to the shearer. The zeal of God’s house did eat up our Lord in Pilate’s hall as well as everywhere else, for there he witnessed a good confession. No thought had he but for the clearing of the divine honour, and the salvation of God’s elect. Brethren, I wish we could arrive at this, to submit our whole spirit to God, to learn self-conquest, and the delivering up on conquered self entirely to God.     The wonderful serenity and submissiveness of our Lord are still better set forth by our text, if it be indeed true that sheep in the East are even more docile than with us. Those who have seen the noise and roughness of many of our washings and shearings will hardly believe the testimony of that ancient writer Philo-Jud‘us when he affirms that the sheep came voluntarily to be shorn. He says; “Woolly rams laden with thick fleeces put themselves into the shepherd’s hands to have their wool shorn, being thus accustomed to pay their yearly tribute to man, their king by nature. The sheep stands in a silent inclining posture, unconstrained under the hand of the shearer. These things may appear strange to those who do not know the docility of the sheep, but they are true.” Marvellous indeed was this submissiveness in our Lord’s case; let us admire and imitate.     II. Thus I have feebly set forth the patience of our beloved Master. Now I want you to follow me, in the second place, to VIEW OUR OWN CASE UNDER THE SAME METAPHOR AS THAT WHICH IS USED IN REFERENCE TO OUR LORD.     Did I not begin by saying that because we were sheep he deigns to compare himself to a sheep? Let us look from another point of view: our Lord was a sheep under the shearers, and as he is so are we also in this world. Though we shall never be offered up like lambs in the temple by way of expiation, yet the saints for ages were the flock of slaughter, as it is written, “For thy sake we are killed all the day long, we are accounted as sheep for the slaughter!” Jesus sends us forth as sheep in the midst of wolves, and we are to regard ourselves as living sacrifices, ready to be offered up. I dwell, however, more particularly upon the second symbol: we are brought as sheep under the shearers’ hands.     Just as a sheep is taken by the shearer, and its wool is all cut off, so doth the Lord take his people and shear them, taking away all their earthly comforts, and leaving them bare. I wish when it came to our turn to undergo this shearing operation it could be said of us as of our Lord, “As a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so he openeth not his mouth.” I fear that we open our mouths a great deal, and make no end of complaining without any apparent cause, or with the very slenderest reason. But now to the figure.     First, remember that a sheep rewards its owner for all his care and trouble by being shorn. There is nothing else that I know of that a sheep can do. It yields food when it is killed, but while it is alive the one payment that the sheep can make to the shepherd is to yield its fleece in due season. Some of God’s people can give to Christ a tribute of gratitude by active service, and they should do so gladly every day of their lives; but many others cannot do much in active service, and about the only reward they can give to their Lord is to render up their fleece by suffering when he calls upon them to suffer, submissively yielding to be shorn of their personal comfort when the time comes for patient endurance.     Here comes the shearer; he takes the sheep and begins to cut, cut, cut, cut, taking away the wool wholesale. Affliction is often used as the big shears. The husband, or perhaps the wife, is removed, little children are taken away, property is shorn off, and health is gone. Sometimes the shears cut off the man’s good name; slander follows; comforts vanish. Well, this is your shearing time, and it may be that you are not able to glorify God to any very large extent except by undergoing this process. If this be the fact, do you not think that we, like good sheep of Christ, should surrender ourselves cheerfully, feeling, “I lay myself down with this intent, that thou shouldst take from me anything and everything, and do what thou wilt with me; for I am not mine own, I am bought with a price”?     Notice that the sheep is itself benefited by the operation of shearing. Before they begin to shear the sheep the wool is long and old, and every bush and briar tears off a bit of the wool, until the sheep looks ragged and forlorn. If the wool were left, when the heat of summer came the sheep would not be able to bear itself, it would be so overloaded with clothing that it would be as uncomfortable as we are when we have kept on our borrowed wool, our flannels and broadcloths, too late. So brethren, when the Lord shears us, we do not like the operation any more than the sheep do; but first, it is for his glory; and secondly, it is for our benefit, and therefore we are bound most willingly to submit. There are many things which we should have liked to have kept which, if we had kept them, would not have proved blessings but curses. A stale blessing is a curse. The manna, though it came from heaven, was only good so long as God’s command made it a blessing, but when they kept it over its due time it bred worms and stank, and then it was no blessing. Many persons would keep their mercies till they turn to corruption; but God will not have it so. Up to a certain point for you to be wealthy was a blessing; it would not have been a blessing any longer, and so the Lord took your riches away. Up to that point your child was a boon, but it would have been no longer so, and therefore it fell sick and died. You may not be able to see it, but it is so, that God, when he withdraws a blessing from his people, takes it away because it would not be a blessing any longer.     Before sheep are shorn they are always washed. Were you ever present at the scene when they drive them down to the brook? Men are placed in rows, leading to the shepherd who stands in the water. The sheep are driven down, and the men seize them, throw them into the pool, keeping their faces above water, and swirl them round and round and round to wash the wool before they clip it off. You see them come out on the other side frightened to death, poor things, wondering whatever is coming. I want to suggest to you, brethren, that whenever a trial threatens to overtake you, you should entreat the Lord to sanctify it to you. If the good Shepherd is going to clip your wool, ask him to wash it before he takes it off; ask to be cleansed in spirit, soul, and body. That is a very good custom Christian people have of asking a blessing on their meals before they eat bread. Do you not think it is even more necessary to ask a blessing on our troubles before we get into them? Here is your dear child likely to die; will you not, dear parents, meet together and ask God to bless the death of that child, if it is to happen? The harvest fails; would it not be well to say—”Lord, sanctify this poverty, this loss, this year’s bad harvest: cause it to be a means of grace to us.” Why not ask a blessing on the cup of bitterness as well as upon the cup of thanksgiving? Ask to be washed before you are shorn, and if the shearing must come, let it be your chief concern to yield clean wool.     After the washing, when the sheep has been dried, it actually loses what was its comfort. The sheep is thrown down, and the shearers get to work; the poor creature is losing its comfortable fleece. You also will have to part with your comforts. Will you recollect this? The next time you receive a fresh blessing call it a loan. Poor sheep, there is no wool on your back but what will have to come off; child of God, there is no earthly comfort in your possession but what will either leave you, or you will leave it. Nothing is our own except our God. “Why,” says once, “not our sin?” Sin was our own, but Jesus has taken it upon himself, and it is gone. There is nothing our own but our God, for all his gifts are held on lease, terminable at his sovereign will. We foolishly consider that our mercies belong to us, and when the Lord takes them away we half grumble. A loan, they say, should go laughing home, and so should we rejoice when the Lord takes back that which he had lent us. All our possessions are but brief favours borrowed for the hour. As the sheep yields up its wool and so loses its comfort, so must we yield up all our earthly properties; or if they remain with us till we die, we shall part with them then, we shall not take so much as one of them across the stream of death.     The shearers take care not to hurt the sheep: they clip as close as they can, but they do not cut the skin. If possible, they will not draw blood, even in the smallest degree. When they do make a gash, it is because the sheep does not lie still: but a careful shearer has bloodless shears. Of this Thomson sings in his Seasons, and the passage is so good an illustration of the whole subject that I will adorn my discourse with it:—

“How meek, how patient, the mild creature lies! What softness in its melancholy face, What dumb complaining innocence appears! Fear not, ye gentle tribes! ‘Tis not the knife Of horrid slaughter that is o’er you waved; No, ’tis the tender swain’s well guided shears, Who having now, to pay his annual care, Borrow’s your fleece, to you a cumbrous load, Will send you bounding to your hills again.”It is the kicking and the struggling that make the shearing work at all hard, but if we are dumb before the shearers no harm can come. The Lord may clip wonderfully close: I have known him clip some so close that they did not seem to have a bit of wool left, for they were stripped entirely, even as Job when he cried, “Naked came I out of my mother’s womb, and naked shall I return thither.” Still, like Job, they have added, “The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away; blessed be the name of the Lord.”     Notice that the shearers always shear at a suitable time. It would be a very wicked, cruel, and unwise thing to begin sheepshearing in winter time. There is a proverb which talks about God “tempering the wind to the shorn lamb.” It may be so, but it is a very cruel practice to shear lambs while winds need tempering. Sheep are shorn when it is warm, genial weather, when they can afford to lose their fleeces, and are all the better for being relieved of them. As the summer comes on sheepshearing time comes. Have you ever noticed that whenever the Lord afflicts us he selects the best possible time? There is a prayer that he put into his disciples’ mouths, “Pray that your flight be not in the winter”: the spirit of that prayer may be seen in the seasonableness of our sorrows. He will not send us our worst troubles at our worst times. If your soul is depressed the Lord does not send you a very heavy burden; he reserves such a load for times when you have joy in the Lord to be your strength. It has come to be a kind of feeling with us that when we have much delight a trial is near, but when sorrow thickens deliverance is approaching. The Lord does not send us two burdens at a time; or, if he does, he sends double strength. His shearing time is chosen with tender discretion.     There is another thing to remember. It is with us as with the sheep, there is new wool coming. Whenever the Lord takes away our earthly comforts with one hand, one, two, three, he restores with the other hand six, a score, a hundred; we are crying and whining about the little loss, and yet it is necessary in order that we may be able to receive the great gain. Yes, it will be so, we shall yet have cause for rejoicing, “joy cometh in the morning.” If we have lost one position, there is another for us: if we have been driven out of one place, a better refuge is prepared. Providence opens a second door when it shuts the first. If the Lord takes away the manna, as he did from his people Israel, it is because they have the old corn of the land of Caanan to live upon. If the water of the rock did not follow the tribes any longer, it was because they drank of the Jordan, and of the brooks. O sheep of the Lord’s fold, there is new wool coming; therefore do not fret at the shearing. I have given these thoughts in brief, that we may come to the last word.     III. Let us, in the third place, endeavour to IMITATE THE EXAMPLE OF OUR BLESSED LORD WHEN OUR TURN COMES TO BE SHORN. Let us be dumb before the shearers, submissive, quiescent, even as he was.     I have been giving, in everything I have said, a reason for so doing. I have shown that our shearing by affliction glorifies God, rewards the Shepherd, and benefits ourselves. I have shown that the Lord measures and tempers our affliction, and sends the trial at the right time. I have shown you in many ways that it will be wise to submit ourselves, as the sheep does to the shearer, and that the more completely we do so the better.     We struggle far too much, and we are apt to make excuses for so doing. Sometimes we say, “Oh, this is so painful, I cannot be patient! I could have borne anything else but this.” When a father is going to correct his child, does he select something pleasant? No. The painfulness of the punishment is the essence of it, and even so the bitterness of our sorrow is the soul of our chastening. By the blueness of the wound the heart will be made better. Do not repine because your trial seems strange and sharp. That would in fact be saying, “If I have it all my own way I will, but if everything does not please me I will rebel”; and that is not a fit spirit for a child of God.     Sometimes we complain because of our great weakness. “Lord, were I stronger I would not mind this heavy loss; but I am frail as a sere leaf driven of the tempest.” But who is to be the judge of the suitability of your trial? You or God? Since the Lord judges this trial to be suitable to your weakness, you may be sure that it is so. Lie still! Lie still! “Alas,” you say, “my grief comes from the most cruel quarter; this trouble did not arise directly from God, it came through my cousin or my brother who ought to have treated me with gratitude. It was not an enemy: then I could have borne it.” My brother, let me assure you that in reality trial comes not from an enemy after all. God is at the bottom of all your tribulation; look through the second causes to the great First Cause. It is a great mistake when we fret over the human instrument which smites us, and forget the hand which uses the rod. If I strike a dog, he bites my stick; poor creature, he knows no better: but if he could think a little he would bite me, or else take the blow submissively. Now, you must not begin biting the stick. After all, it is your heavenly Father that uses the staff; though it be of ebony or of blackthorn, it is in his hand. It is well to have done with picking and choosing our trials, and to leave the whole matter in the hand of infinite wisdom. A sweet singer has put this matter very prettily; let me quote the lines:—

“But when my Lord did ask me on what side I were content, The grief whereby I must be purified, To me was sent,”As each imagined anguish did appear, Each withering bliss Before my soul, I cried, ‘Oh! Spare me here, Oh, no, not this!’

“Like one that having need of, deep within, The surgeon’s knife, Would hardly bear that it should graze the skin, Through for his life.

“Nay, then, but he, who best doth understand Both what we need, And what can bear, did take my case in hand, Nor crying heed.”

    This is the pith of my sermon: oh, believer, yield thyself! Lie passive in the hands of God! Yield thee, and struggle not! There is no use in struggling, for our great Shearer, if he means to shear, will do it. Did I not say just now that the sheep, by struggling, might be cut by the shears! So you and I, if we struggle against God, will get two strokes instead of one; and after all there is not half so much trouble in a trouble as there is in kicking against the trouble. The Eastern ploughman has a goad, and pricks the ox to make it move more actively; he does not hurt it much by his gentle prodding, but suppose the ox flings out its leg the moment it touches him, he drives the goad into himself, and bleeds. So it is with us, we shall find it hard to kick against the pricks; we shall endure much more pain by rebelling than would have come if we had yielded to the divine will. What good comes of fretting? We cannot make one hair white or black. You that are troubled, rest with us, for you cannot make shower or shine, foul or fair, with all your groaning. Did you ever bring a penny into the till by groaning. Did you ever bring a penny into the till by fretting, or put a loaf on the table by complaining? Murmuring is wasted breath, and fretting is wasted time. To lie passive in the hand of God brings a blessing to the soul. I would myself be more quiet, calm, and self-possessed. I long to cry habitually, “Lord, do what thou wilt, when thou wilt, as thou wilt, with me, thy servant: appoint me honour or dishonour, wealth or poverty, sickness or health, exhilaration or depression, and I will take all right gladly from thy hand.” A man is not far from the gates of heaven when he is fully submissive to the Lord’s will.     You that have been shorn have, I hope, received comfort through the ever blessed Spirit of God. May God bless you. Oh that the sinner, too, would humble himself under the mighty hand of God! Submit yourselves unto God, let every thought be brought into captivity to him, and the Lord send his blessing, for Christ’s sake. Amen.

All rights belong to the collections of Charles Spurgeon (C)

 

DAVID KNEW HIS SHEPHERD

Morning

Psalms-46-Verse-1p

And David said in his heart, I shall now perish one day by the hand of Saul.” 1 Samuel 27:1

The thought of David’s heart at this time was a false thought, because he certainly had no ground for thinking that God‘s anointing him by Samuel was intended to be left as an empty unmeaning act. On no one occasion had the Lord deserted his servant; he had been placed in perilous positions very often, but not one instance had occurred in which divine interposition had not delivered him. The trials to which he had been exposed had been varied; they had not assumed one form only, but many–yet in every case he who sent the trial had also graciously ordained a way of escape. David could not put his finger upon any entry in his diary, and say of it, “Here is evidence that the Lord will forsake me,” for the entire tenor of his past life proved the very reverse. He should have argued from what God had done for him, that God would be his defender still. But is it not just in the same way that we doubt God’s help? Is it not mistrust without a cause? Have we ever had the shadow of a reason to doubt our Father’s goodness? Have not his lovingkindnesses been marvellous? Has he once failed to justify our trust? Ah, no! our God has not left us at any time. We have had dark nights, but the star of love has shone forth amid the blackness; we have been in stern conflicts, but over our head he has held aloft the shield of our defence. We have gone through many trials, but never to our detriment, always to our advantage; and the conclusion from our past experience is, that he who has been with us in six troubles, will not forsake us in the seventh. What we have known of our faithful God, proves that he will keep us to the end. Let us not, then, reason contrary to evidence. How can we ever be so ungenerous as to doubt our God? Lord, throw down the Jezebel of our unbelief, and let the dogs devour it.

Evening

Good Shepherd - John 10-28

“He shall gather the lambs with his arm.” Isaiah 40:11

Our good Shepherd has in his flock a variety of experiences, some are strong in the Lord, and others are weak in faith, but he is impartial in his care for all his sheep, and the weakest lamb is as dear to him as the most advanced of the flock. Lambs are wont to lag behind, prone to wander, and apt to grow weary, but from all the danger of these infirmities the Shepherd protects them with his arm of power. He finds new-born souls, like young lambs, ready to perish–he nourishes them till life becomes vigorous; he finds weak minds ready to faint and die–he consoles them and renews their strength. All the little ones he gathers, for it is not the will of our heavenly Father that one of them should perish. What a quick eye he must have to see them all! What a tender heart to care for them all! What a far- reaching and potent arm, to gather them all! In his lifetime on earth he was a great gatherer of the weaker sort, and now that he dwells in heaven, his loving heart yearns towards the meek and contrite, the timid and feeble, the fearful and fainting here below. How gently did he gather me to himself, to his truth, to his blood, to his love, to his church! With what effectual grace did he compel me to come to himself! Since my first conversion, how frequently has he restored me from my wanderings, and once again folded me within the circle of his everlasting arm! The best of all is, that he does it all himself personally, not delegating the task of love, but condescending himself to rescue and preserve his most unworthy servant. How shall I love him enough or serve him worthily? I would fain make his name great unto the ends of the earth, but what can my feebleness do for him? Great Shepherd, add to thy mercies this one other, a heart to love thee more truly as I ought.

All rights belong to the collections of Charles Spurgeon(C)

 

MAY 27, 2013 The Good Shepherd and His Sheep

 

John 10:1-23

The Good Shepherd and His Sheep

10 “Very truly I tell you Pharisees, anyone who does not enter the sheep pen by the gate, but climbs in by some other way, is a thief and a robber. 2 The one who enters by the gate is the shepherd of the sheep. 3 The gatekeeper opens the gate for him, and the sheep listen to his voice. He calls his own sheep by name and leads them out. 4 When he has brought out all his own, he goes on ahead of them, and his sheep follow him because they know his voice.5 But they will never follow a stranger; in fact, they will run away from him because they do not recognize a stranger’s voice.”6 Jesus used this figure of speech, but the Pharisees did not understand what he was telling them.

7 Therefore Jesus said again, â€œVery truly I tell you, I am the gate for the sheep. 8 All who have come before me are thieves and robbers, but the sheep have not listened to them. 9 I am the gate; whoever enters through me will be saved. They will come in and go out, and find pasture. 10 The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full.

11 “I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep.12 The hired hand is not the shepherd and does not own the sheep. So when he sees the wolf coming, he abandons the sheep and runs away. Then the wolf attacks the flock and scatters it. 13 The man runs away because he is a hired hand and cares nothing for the sheep.

14 “I am the good shepherd; I know my sheep and my sheep know me— 15 just as the Father knows me and I know the Father—and I lay down my life for the sheep. 16 I have other sheep that are not of this sheep pen. I must bring them also. They too will listen to my voice, and there shall be one flock and one shepherd. 17 The reason my Father loves me is that I lay down my life—only to take it up again. 18 No one takes it from me, but I lay it down of my own accord. I have authority to lay it down and authority to take it up again. This command I received from my Father.”

19 The Jews who heard these words were again divided. 20 Many of them said, “He is demon-possessed and raving mad. Why listen to him?”

21 But others said, “These are not the sayings of a man possessed by a demon. Can a demon open the eyes of the blind?”

Further Conflict Over Jesus’ Claims

22 Then came the Festival of Dedication at Jerusalem. It was winter, 23 and Jesus was in the temple courts walking in Solomon’s Colonnade.

New International Version (NIV)

Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.

 

Lacking Nothing

I Shall Not Want

Psalm 23:1-6

The ordering of the Psalter is no accident. As English pastor and theologian Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834-1892) observed, it is only after we have read My God, my God, why have you forsaken me? (Ps 22:1) that we come to “The LORD is my shepherd” (Ps 23:1).

Experience teaches us that I lack nothing cannot mean that we will always receive what we desire even if our wants are in keeping with God’s general principles. A man may long to become a missionary, only to be paralyzed in an automobile accident. A woman with wonderful potential as a Christian mother may remain infertile. And what about those desires to improve our lot in life? Many of God’s sheep, both at home and abroad, are hungry, naked ”even dying”at this very moment. The meaning of I lack nothing is that I will never lack anything necessary to my ultimate good ”which God has wrapped up with his own (cf. Ro 8:28,38-39).

The fact is that if this psalm had no valley in it (v. 4), it wouldn’t have any comfort either. When we pass through life’s valleys, we have the assurance that we will never lack anything required for our eternal well-being. The only reason a shepherd would guide his sheep into a dangerous valley would be to lead them through it to a better place (see Heb 11:16,40).

In his personal role as a real-life shepherd, Phillip W. Keller has reflected extensively on Psalm 23.   Following are extracts from his observations on Psalm 23:5:

In thinking about [the] statement You prepare a table before me  it is well to bear in mind that the sheep are approaching this high mountain country of the summer ranges. These are known as alplands or tablelands so much sought after by the sheepmen.

In some of the finest sheep country of the world, especially in the Western United States and Southern Europe, the high plateau of the sheep ranges are always referred to as mesasâ ”the Spanish word for tables.

So it may be seen that what David referred to as a table was actually the entire high summer range. Though these  mesas❠may have been remote and hard to reach, the energetic and aggressive sheep owner takes the time and trouble to ready them for the arrival of his flocks.

It is not always apparent to us what tremendous personal cost it has been for Christ to prepare the table for His own. Just as the lonely, personal privation of the sheepman who prepares the summer range for his stock entails a sacrifice, so the lonely agony of Gethsemane, of Pilateâ’s hall, of Calvary, have cost my Master much.

Think About It: 

  • What does this beloved psalm mean to you personally?
  • What do you feel you lack that you need to turn over to God’s keeping?
  • What does the sacrifice of Jesus teach you about God’s care for you?

Pray About It:

Lord, you are my shepherd. I have everything I need. You give me peace and guide me to do right. Even when bad things happen, I will not be afraid because you are there beside me. Thank you for all you give me.

 

FLAG OVER ISRAEL/JESUS IS THE BANNER

Israeli Flag Flying Over Jerusalem

We Stand-Because G d Stands With Us

Holy Places in Jerusalem-Wailing Wall/Prayer/Music Video

Dear Lord, My Heart Is In The Land of Israel, Lord Send Me!

FACE OF MY SAVIOR-WHERE IT BEGAN, IT SHALL END-WITH THE NEW JERUSALEM

Dear Lord:

We so await your Return!  O Lord, come: (Maranatha) in I Cor. 16:22. Amen!

““I am the good shepherd; I know my sheep and my sheep know me— just as the Father knows me and I know the Father—and I lay down my life for the sheep.” John 10:14-15 NIV

Romans 14:9
For this very reason, Christ died and returned to life so that he might be the Lord of both the dead and the living.